Month: July 2016

Word of the week: Ineluctable

Ineluctable (adjective) “This means impossible to avoid or inescapable. It comes from the Latin ‘to struggle’. So you might say that it reached an ineluctable conclusion. Or that it is ineluctable that my cat Rexy is going to land a modelling deal one day soon because of his amazing beauty... read more

2016 Ned Kelly Awards shortlist announced

The Australian Crime Writers Association recently announced their shortlist for the 2016 Ned Kelly Awards for best in Australian crime writing. We were thrilled to spot a couple of familiar faces among the acclaimed authors. Candice Fox, our amazing presenter of our How to Write About Murder course, is up... read more

A Month of Murder and Mayhem. The free ebook and podcast series.

Crime. Murder. Espionage. Mystery. It’s a world filled with more evil and crime than you can shake a sharpened stick at – where people save the world from certain destruction, where spies, terrorists and thugs abound, and where the killer could be someone in your very own home. It's... read more

Q&A: Coming vs Upcoming

Each week here at the Australian Writers’ Centre, we dissect and discuss, contort and retort, ask and gasp at the English language and all its rules, regulations and ridiculousness. It’s a celebration of language, masquerading as a passive-aggressive whinge about words and weirdness. This week, in an upcoming... read more

Convicted on a Comma: The Trial of Roger Casement

We couldn't help but notice that there is a play opening in Melbourne called Convicted on a Comma: The Trial of Roger Casement. It's the world premiere of a play written, directed and narrated by Brian Gillespie, marking the centenary of Casement's execution on 3 August 1916... read more

Word of the week: Stentorian

Stentorian (adjective) “Do you know what stentorian means? It actually comes from Greek mythology. A stentor was a herald with a loud voice. So the word stentorian is used to describe a loud voice or sound. So you might say that when Darth Vader was angry he expressed this in... read more

Q&A: Harry Potter and the Protagonist’s Stone

Each week here at the Australian Writers’ Centre, we dissect and discuss, contort and retort, ask and gasp at the English language and all its rules, regulations and ridiculousness. It’s a celebration of language, masquerading as a passive-aggressive whinge about words and weirdness. This week, we're casting... read more

Word of the week: Bombastic

Bombastic (adjective) "I know it sounds like an explosion, but actually 'bombast' is an old word meaning material used for padding. These days, it often refers to pompous speech. Like 'he had a bombastic way of talking'." And to hear Valerie and Allison chat more about this and more on... read more

Isabelle Li talks “A Chinese Affair”

This week, we’re chatting with writer Isabelle Li – author of A Chinese Affair. So, tell us Isabelle, for those who haven’t read your book, what’s it about? “A Chinese Affair consists of 16 short stories, exploring the experience of recent Chinese migration to Australia – what it means... read more

Q&A: Among vs Amid

Each week here at the Australian Writers’ Centre, we dissect and discuss, contort and retort, ask and gasp at the English language and all its rules, regulations and ridiculousness. It’s a celebration of language, masquerading as a passive-aggressive whinge about words and weirdness. This week, we're amid... read more

Words of the week: Predilection and Propensity

Predilection and Propensity (noun) "Predilection is almost the same as preference. So you have a predilection for wearing black. Or a predilection for peanut butter on Cruskits. Propensity, on the other hand, is an inclination or tendency. Like someone might have a propensity to blame people for his mistakes. Or... read more

Author Rajith Savanadasa is in “Ruins”

Hot off the press is the first novel from Australian author Rajith Savanadasa, Ruins. “A stunning debut novel from a fresh voice in Australian fiction, for fans of Zadie Smith and Rohinton Mistry,” says the press for this one. So we asked around and tracked him down to answer a... read more

Q&A: A matter of principle

Each week here at the Australian Writers’ Centre, we dissect and discuss, contort and retort, ask and gasp at the English language and all its rules, regulations and ridiculousness. It’s a celebration of language, masquerading as a passive-aggressive whinge about words and weirdness. This week, it's a... read more