Category: Publishers, agents and editors

NY Literary Agent on platform building

Today we’re chatting with Mark Gottlieb, a Literary Agent with New York’s Trident Media Group. Given that so many of us know all about writing but are often in the dark about the agent process, we thought we’d find out more about the world from an agent... read more

Literary agents – and what not to do…

Most aspiring authors looking to publish their manuscript traditionally can envisage a finish line with a publisher and a contract. But the path to that line is often arduous, which is where agents can help. After more than 25 years in the book industry, Melbourne-based Jacinta Di Mase started... read more

Random House’s managing editor talks shop

Brandon VanOver began his career in New York at the literary agency Curtis Brown on the switchboard before becoming an assistant to the legendary children’s book agent Marilyn E. Marlow. He then moved to Sydney and an opening eventually came up as an editorial assistant at Random House. He... read more

What publishers look for: Bernadette Foley tells us.

Bernadette Foley has worked as an editor and publisher in the Australian publishing industry for over 25 years. Her career had also taken her to New York to work with the Penguin Putnam publishing company. She has spoken at writers’ festivals and conducted editing and writing workshops around the country... read more

The Night Guest author on awards, agents and advice

Last week, Fiona McFarlane’s The Night Guest was shortlisted as a finalist in the 2014 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards, adding to the long list of accolades already this year for this debut novel. We thought it would be a good opportunity to share some gems from our podcast... read more

Top 4 rules when submitting your manuscript to a publisher

If you think that manuscripts are judged solely on the merit of the story alone, we think you should be sitting down for this next paragraph.

It doesn’t matter how many on-trend zeitgeist-welding hipsters your story possesses, if a manuscript offends in some other way, it may never be read. We’re talking about things that distract a reader from delving any further.

You see, for editors, it’s hard work wading through countless manuscripts each week. And your goal as a writer is to not make that job any harder!

5 insights from a freelance fiction editor

Kylie Mason is a Sydney-based freelance editor with a long history of working with Australian publishers, both on staff and on a freelance basis.

Despite having a master's degree in creative writing, it’s the editing that gets her up in the morning. "I love getting involved with stories, I love getting involved with writers, and I love the way writers think," she says.

We had a chat with Kylie about being a paid pair of eyes in episode 7 of our top-rated podcast So you want to be a writer. And here's what we discovered.

Getting Published: What are my options?

Blaise van Hecke is the publisher and co-owner of Busybird Publishing. She is also the author of The Book Book: 12 Steps to Successful Publishing and a contributing author to Self-Made: Real Australian Business Stories. For more information visit www.busybird.com.au or contact [email protected]

It wasn't long ago that if you wanted to be published, there was only one route: submitting to what’s known as a commercial (aka ‘traditional’) publisher. Of course, this was during an age where you banged out your work on a typewriter and had to mail out submissions. After all, this was before computers became as common to households as toasters.

Then vanity publishing (now known as self-publishing) came into vogue, but it was an expensive endeavour and lacked credibility. If the book couldn’t make it with a real publisher, then it couldn’t be any good, could it?